The Cretaceous System in the western interior of North America, edited by W.G.E. Caldwell

Cover of: The Cretaceous System in the western interior of North America, edited by W.G.E. Caldwell |

Published by Geological Association of Canada in Toronto .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Geology, Stratigraphic - Cretaceous

Edition Notes

Book details

ContributionsCaldwell, W.G.E.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE 685 C7 1975
The Physical Object
Pagination666 p.
Number of Pages666
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22000481M

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The Cretaceous system in the western interior of North America: the proceedings of an international symposium organized by the Geological Association of Canada and held at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, May(Book, ) [].

The Western Interior Seaway (also called the Cretaceous Seaway, the Niobraran Sea, the The Cretaceous System in the western interior of North America American Inland Sea, and the Western Interior Sea) was a large inland sea that existed during the mid- to late Cretaceous period as well as the very early Paleogene, splitting the continent of North America into two landmasses, Laramidia to the west and Appalachia to the east.

A Cretaceous time scale, in Evolution of the Western Interior Basin, edited by W.G.E. Caldwell, Geol. Assoc. Canada Spec. Paper, 39,). Cretaceous localities are abundant. There are more than USGS-Denver localities in Grand County alone.

The Western Interior Cretaceous Basin of North America evolved as a complex foreland basin between Late Jurassic and Cretaceous time in response to accelerated plate spreading, convergence, and subduction along the western margin of North America.

Sometimes, particularly during the mid-Cretaceous, conditions extended to epicontinental seas, as attested by deposits of black shales in the western interior of North America.

The Cretaceous world had three distinct geographic subdivisions: the northern boreal, the southern boreal, and the Tethyan region. Introduction The Western Interior Seaway, the large inland sea that covered much of North America during Late Cretaceous times, was one of the most extensive of the Late Cretaceous epicontinental seaways.

From Late Albian to Maastrichtian time it extended from the present-day Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. Alencaster, G., and Pantoja-Alor, J.,The rudist Amphitriscoelus (Bivalvia—Hippuritacea) in the lower Cretaceous of southwestern Mexico, J.

Paleontol. The Western Interior Basin of North America (Figs. for detailed basin analysis. 1 and 2) is one of the greatest natural laboratories in the world for understanding the dynamic interac­.

Kauffman, E. G.,Paleobiogeography and evolutionary response dynamic in the Cretaceous Western interior seaway of North America, in Westerman, G. ed., Jurassic–Cretaceous biochronology and paleogeography of North America.

The major physical events that altered life during and at the end of Cretaceous include continued rifting of the former Pangaea, very high sea levels, and some orogenic events, particularly the Sevier orogeny of western North America.

The physical separation of parts of Pangaea separated the animal and plant groups that lived there. Hattin, D. E., a, Stratigraphic study of the Carlile-Niobrara (Upper Cretaceous) unconformity in Kansas and northeastern Nebraska; in, The Cretaceous System in the Western Interior of North America, W.

Caldwell, ed.: Geological Association of Canada, Special Pa p. Redox conditions of the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway recorded by rare earth elements of Bearpaw molluscan fossils.

Shaoneng He, a b T.K. Kyser, c W.G.E. Caldwell d. a Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University,Singapore. b Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N.

At its widest, the Western Interior Seaway stretched across central Cretaceous North America from the Rockies in the west to the Appalachians in the east, a distance of approximately km ( miles). Fossils of many of North America's most famous dinosaurs have been found in the rocks of the Hell Creek Formation in Montana.

Caldwell, W.G.E., and the one recording the CTOAE can be recognised in North America (Gale et al. has been documented throughout the Cretaceous Western Interior, the results of this. The Thermopolis Shale is a geologic edited by W.G.E.

Caldwell book which formed in west-central North America in the Albian age of the Late Cretaceous period. Surface outcroppings occur in central Canada, and the U.S. states of Montana and rock formation was laid down over about 7 million years by sediment flowing into the Western Interior formation's boundaries and members are not well.

The relatively short duration of kimberlite magmatism in the mid‐Cretaceous corridor contrasts with the typically longer periods of magmatism recorded by other kimberlite fields in western North America, e.g., Late Cretaceous (88–68 Ma) kimberlites from the Buffalo Head Hills, Alberta [Eccles et al., ], or Late Cretaceous to Paleogene.

Part of the Topics in Geobiology book series (TGBI, volume 21) Recent studies Mammalian faunal succession in the Cretaceous system of western North America, in The Cretaceous System in the Western Interior of North America (W.

Caldwell, ed.), Geol. Assoc. Can. Williams GD, Stelck CR. Speculations on the Cretaceous palaeogeography of North America. In The Cretaceous system in the Western Interior of North America. Edited by W.G.E. Caldwell. Geological Association of Canada Special Papers Google Scholar.

On the earliest record of Cretaceous tyrannosauroids in western North America: implications for an Early Cretaceous Laurasian interchange event Lindsay E. Zanno Department of Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL,USA Correspondence [email protected] UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY UPPER CRETACEOUS ROCKS AT LAKE TRAVERSE IN WESTERN MINNESOTA by George W.

Shirr Open-File Report This report is preliminary and has not been edited or reviewed for conformity with Geological Survey standards and nomenclature. Cretaceous Period - Cretaceous Period - Major subdivisions of the Cretaceous System: The rocks that were either deposited or formed during the Cretaceous Period make up the Cretaceous System.

The Cretaceous System is divided into two rock series, Lower and Upper, which correspond to units of time known as the Early Cretaceous Epoch ( million to million years ago) and the Late. The Western Interior Seaway. The Western Interior Seaway, also called the Cretaceous Seaway, the Niobraran Sea, and the North American Inland Sea, was a huge inland sea that split the continent of North America into two halves during most of the mid and late Cretaceous Period.

Chapter 11 - The Cretaceous Period. Buy Paleogeography of the Late Cretaceous of the Western Interior of Middle North America: Coal Distribution and Sediment Accumulation (U.S.

Geological Survey Professional Paper, ) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified ordersAuthor: Laura N. Robinson Roberts, Mark A. Kirschbaum.

Franks, P. C.,The transgressive-regressive sequence of the Cretaceous Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Dakota formations of Kansas; in, The Cretaceous System in the Western Interior of North America, W. Caldwell, ed.: Geological Association of Canada, Special Pa p. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip.

Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs.

Images. An illustration of a heart shape Donate. An illustration of text ellipses. System in the Western Interior of North America, W. Caldwell, ed., Geological Association of Canada Special Pa pp. Kauffman, E. (a). The fabric of Cretaceous marine extinctions, in Catastrophes and Earth History—The New Uniformitarianism, W.

Obradovich, J.D. and W.A. Cobban,"A Time-scale for the Late Cretaceous of the Western Interior of North America," in Cretaceous System in the Western Interior of North America, W.G.E. Caldwell (ed.), Geological Association of Canada, Special Pa p. A synthesis of Late Cretaceous paleogeography of the Western Interior from Mexico to southwestern Canada emphasizes the areal distribution of peat-forming environments during six biostratigraphically constrained time intervals.

Isopach maps of strata for each interval reveal the locations and magnitude of major depocenters. The paleogeographic framework provides insight into the relative. Kansas Geological Survey, Current Research in Earth Sciences, Bulletinpart 2 Prev Page--Palynostratigraphy and Correlation.

Conclusions. An update on the palynostratigraphy of the Dakota Formation is presented, identifying four distinctive Albian-Cenomanian palynostratigraphic zones in the areas of Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas. Connects the Artic seas with the Tethy's sea to the south,splitting the continent of North America into two landmasses, Laramidia to the west and Appalachia to the east.

The ancient sea stretched from the Gulf of Mexico and through the middle of the modern-day countries of the United States and Canada, meeting with the Arctic Ocean to the north. centre of the Western Interior Cretaceous province of North America. In Early Albian time, the Western InteriorofNorth America largely was a site for the deposition of continental sediments brought by rivers from the pre-Cretaceous Cordillera.

The rugged Cordillera barred Pacific waters from the cont-Lnenta.I interi. Abstract. A mammal from the Early Cretaceous of the western United States, represented by a lower jaw exceptional in its completeness, presents unambiguous evidence of postcanine dental formula in an Early Cretaceous marsupial-like mammal, and prompts a reconsideration of the early evolution of marsupial dental characters.

These are non marine terrestrial formations. There's lots of Cretaceous stratigraphy in western N. America but its mostly marine. On a quirkier note, when we are talking geology at the GSC we dont consider the west coast as North America. Of couse it. The Cretaceous system in the western interior of North America: the proceedings of an international symposium organized by the Geological Association of Canada and held at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Mayby Saskatoon) Geological Association of Canada ( University of Saskatchewan (Book).

tation source for the eastern margin of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway of North America is an 18O-enriched oceanic coastal jet.

In this subtropical-tropical setting, mid-Cretaceous precipitation rates are interpreted to range from ; to ; mm/yr. Keywords: Cretaceous, North America, Dakota Formation, sphaerosiderites, hydrologic.

The Cretaceous Period is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i.e.

from ± million years ago (Ma)) to the beginning of the Paleocene epoch of the Tertiary Period (about ± Ma). As the longest geological Period, the Cretaceous constitutes nearly half of the Mesozoic. The end of the Cretaceous defines the boundary. Plesiosaur extinction cycles - events that mark the beginning, middle and end of the Cretaceous.

In Caldwell, W. & Kauffman, E. (eds) Evolution of the Western Interior. The map at the left is a reconstruction of North America from 75 million years ago (Campanian Stage). Global sea levels were much higher than today, and a large seaway disected North America into several large landmasses.

This body of water has been named the Western Interior Seaway. Carpenter, K. A Review of short-necked plesiosaurs from the Cretaceous of the western interior, North America. Neues Jahrbuch fuer Geologie und Palaeontologie Abhandlungen (Stuttgart) (2) Carpenter, K.

A new genus and species with affinities to Ceratophyllaceae from the Lower Cretaceous of Kansas, USA is reported. The fruits of Donlesia dakotensis gen. et sp. nov. are smooth achenes with two winged lateral spines, two winged facial spines, one stylar spine, and a long peduncle with a distinctive groove.

The facial spines are arranged perpendicular to the lateral spines. Cretaceous system in the western interior of North America: the proceedings of an international symposium organized by the Geological Association of Canada and held at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, May[].The studied strata were deposited along the western margin of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway of North America, which lay within a wide (c.

km), north–south-trending basin produced by short-wavelength thrust-sheet loading in the Sevier Orogen to the west and long-wavelength dynamic subsidence generated above the subducting.Stratigraphic study of the Carlile-Niobrara (Upper Cretaceous) unconformity in Kansas and northeastern Nebraska.

pp In Caldwell, W. G. E. (ed.), The Cretaceous system in the Western Interior of North America. Geological Society of Canada Special Paper Number

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